Student Wellness Services, along with the help of Jack.org, has begun testing out its new experimental “Therapy Dawg” session in an attempt to better mental health on campus. Based off of the classic therapy dog sessions, “Therapy Dawgs” seek to improve upon the furry friend model by bringing dawgs on campus for students to interact with. By bringing together a variety men from 2004 who are just chill guys, students will be able to interact with various types of “totally dope boys” to de-stress between classes. The new therapy sessions will be held in public spaces within the JDUC so the dawgs will need to be leashed, but the event co-ordinators are still very excited.

“We’re cautiously optimistic,” said Erica Terrific-Buddy, Jack.org special events co-ordinator, “the beta testing has been largely positive so far, but there’s definitely some tweaking to be done.” Early proof of concept events have had their ups and downs - many were excited to get to interact with friendly dawgs and found themselves leaving charmed and delighted, while others felt uncomfortable with the large number really cool dudes. “I’m excited to see where we can take this, there’s definitely a lot of potential,” Erica said while giving a dawg a pat on the head. “They’re beautiful things, they can really brighten your day.”

Of course, with any on campus dawg event, some are protesting the action as “abusive and horrifying.” Queen’s Animal Team for Safety (QATS) has raised allegations before about therapy dog sessions, but these “Therapy Dawg” sessions have driven QATS into hysteria. “This is by far the most disgusting thing we’ve seen from Student Wellness Services. For a service based around helping students, this program does this at the expense of innocent dawgs.” QATS have been seen terrorizing the beta testing of the services and has promised to release these dawgs from captivity. With most of the dawgs having come from the local pound and ghetto housing, only time will tell how this conflict resolves.

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